Parents and Families of Prospective Students

CONTRIBUTING TO STUDENT SUCCESS

Parents and Families of Prospective Students

CONTRIBUTING TO STUDENT SUCCESS

 

At Mines, your student will find the advantages of a world-class research institution on a campus dedicated to collaboration and community. With more than 220 student organizations, numerous recreation opportunities and a thriving culture of outdoor activity, students can find a balance between rigorous academics and enriching personal interests.

 

Resources

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Admissions

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Residence
Life

 

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Undergrad Degree
Programs

Contact Us

Mines Admissions

1812 Illinois St.
Golden, CO 80401

303-384-2027
admissions@mines.edu

 

Academic Calendar

Deadlines, due dates, holidays, exams and more.

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Making Mines
more affordable.

 

Why Mines is the Right Fit

College decisions are difficult. Parents and family members explain why Colorado School of Mines was the right fit for their Oredigger.

Student Support

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Campus
Safety

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Academic Services
and Advising

social care

Counseling
Center

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Health
Center

 

Our Home is Golden

Colorado School of Mines is in the heart of Golden, Colorado—one of the safest cities in the state. We enjoy a historic downtown, numerous arts, sports and music festivals and an active restaurant culture. Golden is surrounded by miles of hiking trails and beautiful mountains for all variety of outdoor sports, plus Denver is only a short 15-minute drive away.

Learn more about Golden >>

Mines Minute

Humans of Mines

Giovani VerdugoBeing a first-generation student means a lot of responsibility, and it’s a challenge that makes me want to satisfy my parents and the people who brought me here…I know I can persevere.

Giovani Verdugo
Class of 2022

Mechanical Engineering

 

 

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Mines Newsroom

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First-of-its-kind study estimates daily PFAS dietary exposure from vegetables in adults and children

If state and federal regulators focus only on the safety of drinking water, the public could still be exposed to concerning levels of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) via the vegetables on their dinner plate if those vegetables are grown with PFAS-impacted water, according to a new study from researchers at Colorado School of Mines and engineering firm Geosyntec.

See more on Mines Newsroom >>