Licensure

PATHWAY OPTIONS for LICENSURE

Our program is tailored specifically for our Mines students and alumni.

We offer courses for students to both try out teaching and to prepare to teach (K-12 or college). A person can start on this path at any point in their Mines career as an undergraduate student, graduate student, or as a Mines alumni. The earlier you begin, the more flexibility you have.

Mines offers teacher licensure in Secondary Science (grades 7-12), Secondary Mathematics (grades 7-12), Middle Grades Mathematics (grades 6-8), and K-12 Computer Science. Licensure can be pursued through one of three pathways:

Minor in Teaching

This minor can be completed in two years or less, preparing you to enter a classroom immediately upon graduation. It requires 24 credit hours with some courses counting as H&SS electives. A teaching license can be added to the Minor with the addition of student teaching.

BS in Design Engineering

This Design Engineering degree with a STEM teaching focus area allows you to earn a teaching license in Math, Science, or Computer Science and to develop deep expertise in integrative design, which will enable you to bridge traditional problem-solving approaches to engineering, creative design, and social sciences in the classroom.

MS in STEM Education

This degree can be completed in as little as one year, you can specialize in one of three areas: Science Teaching, Mathematics Teaching, or Computer Science Teaching.

All Licensure tracks require the three core courses, one practices in the field course, one teaching techniques course, practicum, and student teaching. Non-thesis MS students will also complete 6 credits of electives approved by T@M. All courses can count as undergraduate free electives. Classes marked with * are approved CAS (former H&SS) mid-level required electives, and classes marked with ** are approved CAS (former H&SS) 400-level required electives.

Mathematics Licensure

Core Courses:
SCED262/562 – K-12 Field Experience & Building Student Relationships (3 credits)

SCED333/533 – Educational Psychology & Assessment (3 credits) *

SCED363/563 – Dynamic Teaching: Motivation, Classroom Management, and Differentiation of Instruction (3 credits)

Teaching Technique Course: 
MAED425/525 – Pre-Algebra and Algebra Teaching Techniques (3 credits)

Practices in the Field courses: (Choose ONE of the three)
SCED415/515 – Scientific Practices vs. Engineering Design & the Nature of Science (3 credits)
MAED405/505 – Mathematical Practices & the Social Context of Math (3 Credits)
CSED430/530 – Computer Science Practices and Technological Impacts on Society (3 credits)

Practicum & Student Teaching Courses: 
MAED464/564 – Capstone Curriculum Design I – Practicum (3 credits)

MAED465/565 – Capstone Curriculum Design II – Student Teaching (6-12 credits arranged with Instructor)

 

Field Requirements – Read More Below

Science Licensure

Core Courses:
SCED262/562 – K-12 Field Experience & Building Student Relationships (3 credits)

SCED333/533 – Educational Psychology & Assessment (3 credits) *

SCED363/563 – Dynamic Teaching: Motivation, Classroom Management, and Differentiation of Instruction (3 credits) *

Teaching Techniques Course: 
SCED445/545 – Physics and Chemistry Teaching Techniques (3 credits)

Practices in the Field Course: 
SCED415/515 – Scientific Practices vs. Engineering Design and the Nature of Science (3 credits) **

Practicum and Student Teaching Courses: 
SCED464/564 – Capstone Curriculum Design I – Practicum (3 credits)

SCED465/565 – Capstone Curriculum Design II – Student Teaching (6-12 credits arranged with Instructor)

 

Filed Requirements – Read More Below

Computer Science Licensure

Core Courses: 
SCED262/562 – K-12 Field Experience & Building Student Relationships (3 credits)

SCED333/533 – Educational Psychology & Assessment (3 credits) *

SCED363/563 – Dynamic Teaching: Motivation, Classroom Management, and Differentiation of Instruction (3 credits) *

Teaching Techniques Course:
CSED435/535 – Computer Science Teaching Techniques (3 credits)

Practices in the Field Course: 
CSED430/530 – Computer Science Practices & Technological Impacts on Society (3 credits) **

Practicum & Student Teaching Courses:
CSED564 – Capstone Curriculum Design I – Practicum (3 credits)

CSED565 – Capstone Curriculum Design II – Student Teaching (6-12 credits arranged with Instructor)

 

Field Requirements – Read More Below

Field Requirements
  • 800 total hours, as a combination of field and service hours
      • Service Hours: Between 50 – 150 of these hours will be service hours. Service is something outside of the classroom with a K-12 audience through an organized/supervised activity. Typically these are for a school through a tutoring program or chaperoning a dance.  Service hours can also come from activities outside schools.  There are also opportunities at Mines (mostly through Computer Science) that are organized programs for students (eg. Middle school girls). Service hours can be earned through a paid position – they do not have to be voluntary.
      • Field Hours: The other 650 – 750 hours will be field hours. Field hours have to be completed with a licensed teacher during their regular teaching job (classroom hours, planning, grading, etc). These hours are earned while taking K12 Field Experience (SCED262/562), Capstone I – Practicum (SCED/MAED/CSED464/564) and Capstone II – Student Teaching (SCED/MAED/CSED465/565). There’s a minimum requirement of 75 hours for Field Experience, 100 hours in Practicum, and 400 hours for Student Teaching. A person can do more hours during Field Experience or Practicum, which will reduce the hours needed for student teaching. During the one semester of student teaching there’s time to get a maximum of 640 hours.
  • Grade Level Field Hours:
    – Candidates seeking 7-12 Science licensure or 7-12 Mathematics licensure, must have a minimum of 25 hours of field experience with each of the following grade levels: middle school (7-8) and high school (9-12).
    – Candidates seeking K-12 Computer Science licensure, must have a minimum of 25 hours of field experience with each of the following grade levels: elementary school (K-6), middle school (7-8), and high school (9-12).
  •  
  • Diverse Field Hours:
    Candidates are expected to engage in a minimum of 20 hours of diverse range of field experiences, comprising with each of the following student groups:
    1. Male and Female students
    2. At least two among the following racial/ethnic demographics: White or Caucasian, Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, Asian or Asian American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, and Middle Eastern or North African.
    3. Both students eligible for free and reduced lunch programs and those who are not
    4. English Language learners
    5. Students requiring additional support, including those with a 504 plan and individuals with an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP)

The Diverse Field Experience and Grade Level Experience hours are not in addition to the 800 total field hours required, but will be obtained concurrently with one of your placements. Kindly refrain from directly questioning students about their eligibility for any of the above criteria. Instead, collaborate with your mentor teacher to gain insights into the diverse student populations within the assigned classrooms.

  • Your student teaching placement must fall in your licensure area. For example, if you are obtaining a 6-8 Mathematics Licensure, your student teaching placement must be in a 6th, 7th, or 8th grade math classroom.

Additional Notes & Advice:

  • Think about saving your student teaching experience for the setting you most likely want to be hired into for your first year of teaching
  • If you take Field Experience and Practicum at the same time, you can be placed in the same classroom to complete all of the hours, however we strongly recommend doing two very different placements to help you better see the difference between schools and student populations (grade level as well as students with different backgrounds). 
  • Early hire option for Minor or BSE: Colorado has an option for people who are done with all of their BS coursework, except student teaching. If you are teaching in a high needs area then you can do what is called “Teacher of Record” (math and science qualify in 2023, while computer science won’t qualify until 2024). In this case you would not have a mentor teacher, you would have a mentor in the building and your Mines supervisor but you would be the classroom teacher – there would not be a classroom teacher whose room you are working in. If you do this, you get paid a full salary.
  • Early hire option for MS: Colorado has an adjunct license for people who already have a BS. You would need to find a school who would hire with this license while you finish your student teaching. In this case you would not have a mentor teacher, you would have a mentor in the building and your Mines supervisor but you would be the classroom teacher – there would not be a classroom teacher whose room you are working in. If you do this, you get paid a full salary.

To become a K-12 teacher in other areas (eg. Elementary, Business and Marketing), see our page on Other Pathways to Licensure.

Inspire Young Minds! Teach Science, Math, or CS.

Did you know…

  • Teachers rate their lives better than all occupation groups, trailing only physicians.
  • Teachers have flexible summers that they can use to travel, learn, spend time with family and friends, and recharge.
  • There are student loan forgiveness programs and scholarships for math and science teachers.
  • Most teaching jobs have better retirement benefits than other jobs you can get with the same degree.
  • You can get a job almost anywhere in the U.S. or abroad as a science or math teacher.
  • At year 15, the middle 50% of teachers make between $68,000 and $114,000.
  • Science teachers report having higher overall job satisfaction than other STEM professionals.
  • Teachers earn additional pay for optional activities like coaching and running student organizations ranging between $1,000 and $15,000 per activity.
  • Math and science teachers are in high demand.
  • Teacher retention is better than most other occupations.
  • Behind every advance in medicine or technology is a teacher who left a lasting impression.